Jivin’ with Jazz keeps program in the groove

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CHARLES CITY — Jivin’ with Jazz attracted a full house Tuesday night at Trinity United Methodist Church in Charles City. The major fundraiser for the Charles City High School jazz band program included a performance by the school’s new jazz choir, Rhymes With Orange.

It was also an occasion to put the spotlight on the band’s seniors, introduce middle school musicians and remember a lost friend.

The placemats at the tables were designed for the 2011 Jivin’ with Jazz by jazz band member Trent Smith, who died in a crash last year on the Avenue of the Saints. This year’s crew decided to bring the design back in his memory.

The night began with a performance from the jazz band comprised of high and middle school musicians, a new mix this year, band director Jacob Gassman said. It performed “Jordu” by Duke Jordan, “The Blues at Frog Bottom,” and “Swing Fever.”

It was followed by the jazz choir, whose members included Ashlyn Bauer, Olivia Wolfe, Mackenzie Wilson, Maci Milks, McKenna Oleson, Crystal Stiles, Ruby Peterson, Ryan Parker, Tyreque Baker, Nathan Shultz, Stephen Bachman, Ryan Wolfe, John Perez, Dylan Parsons and Aaron Montemayor.

They were accompanied by Nicole Loftus on drums, Darian Cleveland on bass and Chris Cleveland on piano.

Rhymes With Orange performed “Bridge Over Troubled Water” by  Kirby Shaw, “Nearness of You” by Kirby Shaw with a solo by Ashlyn Bauer, and Jeremy Fox’s arrangement of  “Amazing Grace” with solos by Dylan Parsons and Tyreque Baker.

The jazz ensemble closed out the night by performing “Brass Machine” by Mark Taylor, “The Cardinal Shuffle by Bob Washnut, “Misty” by Burke and Garner, “Autumn Leaves” by Johnny Mercer, “Bye, Bye Blackbird” by Dixon and Henderson, “Orange Sherbert” by Sammy Nestico and Sabor de Cuba by Victor Lopez.

Gassman thanked the audience at the sold-out dinner and a concert fundraiser. He said such turnout has helped the program be fully self-sustaining. The proceeds from Jivin’ with Jazz have been used for equipment and festival entry fees, for example, he said.

 

 

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